Incheon United

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RJB
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Incheon United

Postby RJB » Mon Aug 20, 2018 2:04 am

I don't watch the K-League these days, but have followed it fairly casually since my days in Korea (2006-2008). I lived in Incheon at the time and so went to a few Incheon United games and continue to follow them to date. For what it's worth, I'm a Whitecaps fan, a Hibs fan, and with a new Canadian league starting in 2019, a fan of a to-be-determined team in that league.

I'm here because I just saw they lost 7-0 to Gangwon, and are sitting at the bottom of the table. And it seems to me that they've been really bad ever since I started to follow them. A quick google says they've only failed to finish in the bottom half three times since I've followed them (and only four times ever!). I rarely - if ever - see a player on the national team, and watch them time and again mired in poor form.

I'm here to ask, why? Is there any investment in the team? I know they're community owned, so maybe the poor attendance leads to poor investment? And furthermore, isn't their new stadium nice? I've only seen pictures, but it strikes me as a bit of a mini-jewel of a park.

Beautiful stadium, beautiful crest and jerseys, community owned, all things that are in their favour I would think. So I kindly ask, what is it with this soon to be K League 2 team?

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eujin
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Re: Incheon United

Postby eujin » Tue Aug 21, 2018 5:33 am

Part of the answer to your question can be found at the very useful (German) website transfermarkt.com
https://www.transfermarkt.com/k-league-classic/startseite/wettbewerb/RSK1
According to their model, the only team in the K-League to invest less in their squad is Pohang, and they have a higher average value per player, because they have a smaller squad. Daegu have an almost identical average value per player as Incheon.

Investments in football have been going down in the past few years generally in Korea (just as the Chinese started to flash the chequebook around). It was only ever the chaebol and billionaire-owned teams that invested heavily. Pohang's budget was slashed when long-time POSCO boss, Park Tae-joon, passed away, Seongnam hit the skids when Mr Moonie, Sun Myung Moon, died in 2012.

If you look at the Incheon squad, none of the players there have a value over 500,000 euros (about the same as Ronaldo earns per week). Stefan Mugosa is the big foreign striker hope. He doesn't have a stellar career record outside of Montenegro and Korea, playing for 1860 Munich while they got relegated to the German regional leagues. Elios Aguilar was not in the Costa Rica squad for the 2018 World Cup, which means he was beaten out by several players who play domestically in Costa Rica (you might be familiar with Bolanos). Incheon also have Kwabena Appiah, who has never played internationally for either Australia or New Zealand.

Despite Mipo's fascination, Jørn Andersen doesn't have a stellar coaching career either. His only real success was taking over from Jürgen Klopp at Mainz and getting them promoted back to the Bundesliga. He also got Austria Salzburg promoted out of the Austrian regional leagues in 2015, although they then went bust. He got North Korea qualified for the Asian Cup in 2019.

Crane
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Re: Incheon United

Postby Crane » Thu Aug 23, 2018 6:27 am

Andersen is different than the man he replaced in that he's much more authoritative, but they both like attacking a bit too much for a club of Incheon's stature. Today was a step in the right direction, with Aguilar withdrawn into midfield to help out. But Andersen's lack of defensive acumen can still be seen in how many leads Incheon have given up.

Lack of player continuity is another major problem, with lots of turnover throughout the team. Although this is problem with most K-League teams.

You are right though, it's a nice ground in a decently well-populated area. It's shame they're like this.


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