Incheon United’s North: K-League better than A-League

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Gerd Bibimbapper
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Re: Incheon United’s North: K-League better than A-League

Postby Gerd Bibimbapper » Wed Feb 03, 2010 10:11 am

"He has a contract in Korea, but according to his agent they are prepared to release him as they have too many foreign players."


So what's the K-League ceiling on foreign players?
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Re: Incheon United’s North: K-League better than A-League

Postby Sampo » Wed Feb 03, 2010 10:41 am

It should still be the 3+1 rule, meaning three foreigners plus one player from an AFC country are allowed. North would be taking their Asian slot.

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Re: Incheon United’s North: K-League better than A-League

Postby Gerd Bibimbapper » Wed Feb 03, 2010 11:29 am

It should still be the 3+1 rule, meaning three foreigners plus one player from an AFC country are allowed. North would be taking their Asian slot.


Thanks Sampo.
So have they got an AFC player in to bolster their reserves?

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Re: Incheon United’s North: K-League better than A-League

Postby Holyjoe » Fri Feb 26, 2010 7:07 am

He's got his move away, but to a different club than he went on trial with:

Go North young man: Jade's plan to keep World Cup dreams alive
MICHAEL COCKERILL
February 26, 2010

Former Newcastle Jets skipper Jade North hopes to revitalise his World Cup chances by moving to the top of the world after this week securing a transfer to Norwegian side Tromso.

Tromso, one of two Norwegian clubs inside the Arctic Circle, has signed North on a free transfer from his South Korean side, Incheon United. North, 28, left the Jets at the end of the 2009 season, initially to join North Queensland Fury. But he never played a game for the Fury, who agreed to release him immediately to Incheon United, where North hoped he could advance his Socceroos ambitions.

It didn't work out that way, with North frozen out of the first team by coach Ilija Petkovic for virtually the whole season. In recent months, Socceroos coach Pim Verbeek has made it clear North's lack of first team football was counting heavily against him.

North got the message, and during the recent January transfer window fielded a number of offers from European clubs, among them Trelleborgs (Sweden), Randers (Denmark) and Maritimo (Portugal), as well as Japanese side Vissel Kobe. Ultimately, he settled on Norway, where he has signed an initial six-month deal with Tromso to replace injured defender Kevin Larsen.

North is in camp with the Socceroos, preparing for next week's decisive Asian Cup qualifier against Indonesia in Brisbane, but his participation in that match could now be in doubt. Tromso open the new Norwegian season with a home match against newly promoted Honefoss BK in a fortnight, and are finishing their pre-season in Turkey.

''It's a great move for 'Jado', and obviously it's what he needs going into the World Cup,'' his agent, Buddy Farah said. ''Things didn't work out for him in Korea, but he never let his head go down.''

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Re: Incheon United’s North: K-League better than A-League

Postby Rothesay Saint » Fri Mar 04, 2016 7:56 pm

North’s difficulties were compounded when he signed for South Korea’s Incheon United in 2009. He’s not sure now whether he actually wanted to play overseas at the time but he felt pressure to do so because that’s what professional players are supposed to aspire to, isn’t it? It was certainly what so many of his Socceroos team-mates at the time were doing. “I’ve made a great career financially [playing overseas] but it came after I used to put a lot of pressure on myself. I was 28 and worried that I’d miss the boat if I didn’t go. You listen to other people and do what they think is best for you. It’s not always the best way.”

It wasn’t for North who was now dealing with the dislocation of being in South Korea; the language barrier, the crushing winter, a plethora of other small but consequential changes. Anti-depressants didn’t work for him, and it wasn’t until he “reached out” to Jets doctor Neil Halpin that he fully recognised the scale of his depression and began to seek treatment and get better.

North spoke of his time with depression during Mental Health Week in 2014 and he’s happy to continue to speak about if it encourages others to seek help, not least other athletes whose public profiles can increase their reluctance to come forward. In a similar vein, North is happy to be seen as a role model for Indigenous youth having endured an often fraught time with his identity when growing up.


Full article in the guardian

http://www.theguardian.com/sport/blog/2 ... t-survivor
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Re: Incheon United’s North: K-League better than A-League

Postby Gas1883 » Mon Mar 14, 2016 7:59 pm

Rothesay Saint wrote:
North’s difficulties were compounded when he signed for South Korea’s Incheon United in 2009. He’s not sure now whether he actually wanted to play overseas at the time but he felt pressure to do so because that’s what professional players are supposed to aspire to, isn’t it? It was certainly what so many of his Socceroos team-mates at the time were doing. “I’ve made a great career financially [playing overseas] but it came after I used to put a lot of pressure on myself. I was 28 and worried that I’d miss the boat if I didn’t go. You listen to other people and do what they think is best for you. It’s not always the best way.”

It wasn’t for North who was now dealing with the dislocation of being in South Korea; the language barrier, the crushing winter, a plethora of other small but consequential changes. Anti-depressants didn’t work for him, and it wasn’t until he “reached out” to Jets doctor Neil Halpin that he fully recognised the scale of his depression and began to seek treatment and get better.

North spoke of his time with depression during Mental Health Week in 2014 and he’s happy to continue to speak about if it encourages others to seek help, not least other athletes whose public profiles can increase their reluctance to come forward. In a similar vein, North is happy to be seen as a role model for Indigenous youth having endured an often fraught time with his identity when growing up.


Full article in the guardian

http://www.theguardian.com/sport/blog/2 ... t-survivor


Very interesting! Thanks for posting it.
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