Forced Change

Discussion about the Taeguk Warriors.
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eujin
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Re: Forced Change

Postby eujin » Sat Jul 12, 2014 2:20 am

OttoSilver wrote:Agreed. Considering that the so called A-Class players who play in other leagues made up the bulk of the rather poor national team, you cant help but see it as obvious. If you are not as good as a bunch of players who are not exactly world beaters themselves, then how can you be included in an A-Class conversation?

To be truthful they were disappointing. They've played a lot better in the past than they did in Brazil. The Korean team played a lot better in 2010 and 2006, not to mention 2002. They can do much better than what they showed. In the first half against Algeria it was clear something was up even before the first goal went in. Algeria did exactly what Russia should've done and came at them early. But by the time the Koreans woke up the damage was done. It happens sometimes, even to the best teams.

I don't think it was obvious that they were going to do poorly just because the players all play bit part roles in mid table, not very good teams of average leagues. Just look at where the Algerians all play. The keeper plays in Bulgaria. Djabou, the scorer of the third goal plays in Tunisia. Halliche plays for a mid table Portugese outfit. Brahimi, the scorer of the fourth goal, plays for a bottom dwelling Spanish team after being out on loan from Rennes for most of his career and the captain Bougherra is currently unattached having been released by Qatari Lekhwiya. Yet this band of second and third-rate guys brought the Germans to within an inch of their lives in the round of sixteen.

And they're not the only ones either. Bryan Ruiz who scored Costa Rica's winner against Italy has spent most of the last four years on the bench at Fulham, Argentina's keeper Sergio Romero who sits on the bench at Monaco hasn't conceded a goal in over five hours of knock-out football and Gary Medel who was a rock in the middle of Chile's defence has just gone down with Kim Bo-kyung and Cardiff City. Some of the players on the German team that destroyed Brazil even play in the same league as the likes of Hong Jeong-ho, Koo Ja-cheol and Son Heung-min. But by far the best is Australia's Massimo Luongo, who plays for Swindon Town. If that isn't a badge of respect and guarantee of pedigree I don't what is.

The Koreans know they can do better. With a bit of luck they will do in the future.

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Re: Forced Change

Postby SteveW » Sat Jul 12, 2014 2:44 am

eujin wrote:
OttoSilver wrote:Agreed. Considering that the so called A-Class players who play in other leagues made up the bulk of the rather poor national team, you cant help but see it as obvious. If you are not as good as a bunch of players who are not exactly world beaters themselves, then how can you be included in an A-Class conversation?

To be truthful they were disappointing. They've played a lot better in the past than they did in Brazil. The Korean team played a lot better in 2010 and 2006, not to mention 2002. They can do much better than what they showed. In the first half against Algeria it was clear something was up even before the first goal went in. Algeria did exactly what Russia should've done and came at them early. But by the time the Koreans woke up the damage was done. It happens sometimes, even to the best teams.

I don't think it was obvious that they were going to do poorly just because the players all play bit part roles in mid table, not very good teams of average leagues. Just look at where the Algerians all play. The keeper plays in Bulgaria. Djabou, the scorer of the third goal plays in Tunisia. Halliche plays for a mid table Portugese outfit. Brahimi, the scorer of the fourth goal, plays for a bottom dwelling Spanish team after being out on loan from Rennes for most of his career and the captain Bougherra is currently unattached having been released by Qatari Lekhwiya. Yet this band of second avend third-rate guys brought the Germans to within an inch of their lives in the round of sixteen.

And they're not the only ones either. Bryan Ruiz who scored Costa Rica's winner against Italy has spent most of the last four years on the bench at Fulham, Argentina's keeper Sergio Romero who sits on the bench at Monaco hasn't conceded a goal in over five hours of knock-out football and Gary Medel who was a rock in the middle of Chile's defence has just gone down with Kim Bo-kyung and Cardiff City. Some of the players on the German team that destroyed Brazil even play in the same league as the likes of Hong Jeong-ho, Koo Ja-cheol and Son Heung-min. But by far the best is Australia's Massimo Luongo, who plays for Swindon Town. If that isn't a badge of respect I don't what is.

The Koreans know they can do better. With a bit of luck they will do in the future.


Previous squad performance is pretty irrelevant though as this was a pretty new squad. And looking at the squad anyone who seriously thought they were going to have an impact at the World Cup was borderline delusional. Its not even that the individual players are that bad but rather that they are all much of a muchness. A lot of mobile, hard working, fairly attacking midfield players who can't score goals. Couple that with a defence that was full of holes and it isn't a recipe for success.

Its fine to point out that so-and-so isn't a regular either but there's a critical mass of these things when you are relying on them as your key men. If Park Chu Young and Lee Chung Yong had turned up like they did in 2010 it may have been different but as it was they performed about how you would expect. That's the weird thing about all this 'Korean football has died' BS - the team did basically what you would expect. They were the lowest ranked team in the group, they went into the tournament on poor form and looking ill-prepared and disorganised and finished bottom.
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Re: Forced Change

Postby Crane » Sat Jul 12, 2014 7:58 am

eujin wrote:
SteveW wrote:The more I think about the more it seems the biggest mistake Hong made was taking the job in the first place. He's now been hounded out by clowns that probably won't even watch the Asian Cup games he will no longer be in charge of.

I doubt he'll have a hard time finding another job. It has damaged Korea's reputation more than it has damaged his.

I'm not sure about that. Hong's reputation has taken a beating. Some Koreans have linked everything bad that's happened to Korean football to Hong and his 'cronies.' One person blamed Hong for Ki and co's petulance at Choi Kanghee when he was NT manager. They said he'd agreed to take the NT job post-CKH and let Ki know about, thus giving Ki license to act up against a manager who he knew wouldn't be leading them at the World Cup. I don't believe a lot of the BS that's swirling around Hong, but people definitely aren't looking too favorably. Although a lot of that crowd is the once-in-four-years bandwagon.

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eujin
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Re: Forced Change

Postby eujin » Sat Jul 12, 2014 8:10 am

Crane wrote:Hong's reputation has taken a beating.

I've seen a lot of people writing bad things about Hong, but I've yet to see anyone with any football sense say he's a bad manager. Capello's reputation on the other hand...


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